Winter Storm Operations - 4f

Knowing the time it takes to clear roads after a winter storm can help the department better analyze the costs associated with that work. MoDOT’s response rate to winter events provides good customer service for the traveling public while keeping costs as low as possible.

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Write Up:

Knowing the time it takes to clear roads after a winter storm can help the department better analyze the costs associated with that work. MoDOT’s response to winter events provides good customer service for the traveling public while keeping costs as low as possible. These efforts result in reduced traffic delays due to winter events and, more importantly, safer travel during these events.  In recent years, MoDOT has been more aggressive in messaging the public urging them to travel only if necessary during winter events. This messaging is in the form of social media pushes and media releases. The 2021-2022 season was especially challenging due to MoDOT’s maintenance function being understaffed by several hundred employees.  It was communicated to the public that MoDOT anticipated it would take longer to clear the roads following a winter event.  The 2021-2022 winter season started out mild, with only two events occurring between December 19 and the end of the year.  The remainder of the season had several multi-day events occur between January and March, with a record setting accumulation event occurring the first week of February.  MoDOT’s time for meeting objectives for continuous operations routes was 8.2 hours and 9.4 hours for non-continuous routes.

On average, winter operations cost about $51 million per year. MoDOT expended $51.1 million through April 15, 2022 for the 2021-2022 winter season.

Purpose of the Measure:

This measure tracks the amount of time needed to perform MoDOT’s snow and ice removal efforts. It also reviews the impacts of significant events and the measures taken to minimize these impacts.

Measurement and Data Collection:

For major highways and regionally significant routes, the objective is to restore them to a mostly clear condition as soon as possible after the storm has ended. MoDOT calls these “continuous operations” routes. State routes with lower traffic volumes should be opened to two-way traffic and treated with salt or abrasives at critical areas such as intersections, hills and curves. These are called “non-continuous operations” routes. After each winter event, maintenance personnel submit reports indicating how much time it took to meet the objectives for both route classifications. For significant events, the Regional Integrated Transportation Information System is used to determine traveler delays and the associated costs in order to determine the magnitude of the impacts of these significant winter events.

Results Driver

Contact Photo
employee photo
Nicole Hood
Title
State Highway Safety and Traffic Engineer
Department
Highway Safety and Traffic
Contact Info

Email: nicole.hood@modot.mo.gov

Phone: (573) 526-2803

Measurement Driver

Contact Photo
a portrait of Paul Denkler
Paul Denkler
Title
Maintenance Liaison
Department
Maintenance
Contact Info

Email: Paul.Denkler@modot.mo.gov 

Phone: (573) 526-3282