Muddy Creek Bridge

Mercer County U.S. Route 136

Bridge replacement project began October 4, 2017.

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Mobirise

U.S. Route 136 Bridge over Muddy Creek

Contractors from Boone Construction Company of Columbia, working with the Missouri Department of Transportation, began replacing the old bridge on Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2017.

Old Bridge versus New Bridge

The old bridge, built in 1929, carries more than 1,000 cars and trucks per day. It's approximately 22 feet wide.

The new bridge will be 32 feet wide with four-foot shoulders.

Detour

Motorists are being directed on a signed detour around the project on Routes 6, 5 and US Route 65.

Schedule

The road closed to all traffic on Oct.  24 and is expected to remain closed through February.

All scheduled work is weather permitting and subject to change.

Mobirise

This picture shows the demolition of the existing bridge. This process is somewhat long due to ensuring proper clean up of the materials from the old bridge.

MoDOT and our contractors work closely with many departments including the Department of Natural Resources, Department of Conservation, etc. to ensure that any material used in the construction of the old bridge is removed in such a way that it minimizes any hazardous effect to the surrounding environment, flora and fauna.

In this picture, MoDOT's Senior Construction Technician is seen near the center of the photo. He's heading to communicate with Boone Construction’s supervisor to discuss the demolition. In the background you can see the east side end bent being removed.

What's a bent? Here's a definition from our Modot.org website: A rigid frame commonly made of reinforced concrete or steel that supports a vertical load and is placed transverse to the length of a structure. Bents are commonly used to support beams and girders. An end bent is the supporting frame forming part of an abutment. The vertical members of a bent are columns or piles.

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Week of Nov. 13 There will to be four drilled shafts for this bridge. This blueprint shows the plans for one of them. A drilled shaft is a deep foundation that is constructed by placing concrete in a drilled hole. Drilled shafts can be an economical alternative to spread footing or driven pile foundations. These shafts can be drilled into a wide variety of soils and rocks.  

Week of Nov. 13 Hayes Drilling, a subcontractor on the project, is inserting a temporary casing into the excavated drill shaft. The temporary casing is used for stability and to prevent the excavated hole to collapse. Once the permanent casing is placed the temporary casing will be removed.  

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Week of Nov. 13 Hayes Drilling pumping water into their excavated hole to be mixed with the slurry. The slurry is used to maintain stability of the excavation to aid in the drilling process. 

Week of Nov. 13 Hayes Drilling and Boone Construction inserting the permanent casing. This casing is being placed into the excavated hole at a depth of 46’ 3 ¼” into the soil. Then drilled 7’ 1/2'” into the rock. Once the permanent casing is in place the temporary casing will be removed. 

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Week of Nov. 13 Shown are the reinforcing steel cages that will be inserted into the drilled shafts. These are 60’ in length and are inspected before placement. These shafts will be immediately placed after the shaft exaction is inspected and accepted. Once these reinforced steel cages are placed and set the contractor will pour concrete. 

Week of Nov. 27
A worker with Boone Construction company checks the forms on one of the center support structures, or bents, as we noted in the second photo in this series. These forms are used to make a bent cap.

What is a bent cap? A bent cap sits on top of the columns or piles. It stretches across the width of the bridge (across all lanes) and takes the weight (or load) crossing the bridge deck and transfers it to the columns or piles.

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Week of Nov. 27
During construction, most people don't get an up close look and an end bent. An end bent is the supporting frame forming part of an abutment. Bents are commonly used to support beams and girders. In the picture you can see the green reinforcing steel sticking out at the top. This type of steel is green due to an epoxy coating used for corrosion resistance.

Week of Nov. 27
 Here is an inside look at a bent cap. This picture captures how precise each bar is to be spaced to meet specifications for the plans of the bridge. Inspectors check the spacing measurements before the cage is placed. Once it passes inspection, it is then placed and forms are placed on each side, ready for concrete to be poured. 

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Week of Nov. 27
Boone Construction Company crew members are pouring concrete into the bent cap form. A concrete plant nearby delivers concrete to the job site once the workers are ready. The concrete truck fills up the hopper that's shown in the phot between the workers, and a crane swings it to the workers near the cap. A lever opens the bottom of the hopper, releasing the concrete into the cap. 

Week of Nov. 27
 This picture shows the forms removed from the cap, revealing the finished product. The actual size of the cap is 4’6” high and 5’0” wide. It's 31’2” from end to end. The cap was poured above the drilled shafts, connecting the two for stabilization. 

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Week of Dec. 4
One of the bridge girders being delivered to the job site. These girders were fabricated off-site at Coreslab in Marshall, Missouri. Boone Construction Company crews operate two cranes simultaneously to remove the girder off the truck and place it on and between two caps to form the center span. 

Week of Dec. 4
A span is known as the horizontal space between two supports of a structure. The girder is lowered just enough so workers can slightly move the ends to align over the laminated neoprene bearing pad on the caps. These bearing pads compress on vertical load and accommodate horizontal rotation. Once one end of the girder is aligned and set, the other end is slowly lowered and set. 

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Week of Dec. 4
This girder has been set on the North side of the center span, looking towards the East. The distance between the center of intermediate bent 2 and 3 is a total of 87’0”. If you look closely, you can see a slight camber in the center of the girder. A camber is known as a positive, upward deformation built into a beam due to the application of pre-stressing forces. 

Week of Dec. 4
These four set girders are part of the center span. Once Boone Construction Company sets all 12 girders for this bridge, the deck panels will be placed on top. They comprise the deck. There are a total of three different types of deck panels being used on this bridge, for a combined total of 93. 

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Week of Dec. 18
These concrete bridge panels are precast at Core Slab in Marshall and used to form the lower half of the bridge deck. On this bridge there are a total of 93 panels, totaling 613 square yards of surface area. After their installation the contractor will place reinforcing steel and concrete over the top to tie them together with the finished bridge deck.

Week of Dec. 18
The foreman from Boone Construction double checks the plans for the bridge deck. The bridge deck is the surface of the bridge and is one structural element of the superstructure. This specific deck is constructed from steel and concrete. 

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Week of Dec. 18
It's a bit dark, but this is a boom-style concrete pump truck. The concrete pump truck uses a remote-controlled articulating arm called a boom to place the concrete.

Week of Dec. 18
Two Boone Constructions employees place the bridge deck. While one employee directs the placement of the concrete the other will follow with a vibration tool. The purpose of the vibration tool is to reduce the internal friction of the mix components of cement, aggregate, and water allowing the mix to better consolidate. Behind the employees in the photo is the bridge deck finisher. This machine will move slowly along finishing the concrete at the correct depth and area of the deck. 

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Week of Dec. 18
And here's the freshly placed bridge deck. The deck will be sprayed with a chemical sealant that will help the concrete cureand a burlap sheeting that is wet is laid on it to help keep moisture in the concrete to make sure it strengthens. The contractor will let the deck get the sufficient amount of strength before driving any machinery on it. The overall cure time is usually 7 days.   

Feb. 1, 2018
This picture shows the concrete slab approach on the West side of the bridge. The concrete slab approach on the west side of the bridge was placed on Friday, Jan. 26. Due to the cold weather, the contractor decidedto use a Ground E3000 Heater to keep the concrete from freezing. The heater is used to circulate and heat water throughout the coils which are placed on top of the approach slab. There was wind chill of eight degrees the day this picture was taken. 

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Feb. 1, 2018
Once the approach was placed, crew members began laying out damp burlap across the approach followed by plastic sheeting. The coils from the generator are then spread evenly throughout the approach, distributing heat. The next layer consists of large thermal blankets and topped with another layer of plastic. As you can see, the crew members placed random weighted objects to keep the plastic from blowing off the approach. 

Feb. 1, 2018
This is the wing wall on the west side abutment. The green epoxy-coated rebar running down both sides of the bridge are for the safety barrier curb. The total height for the barrier curb from the top of the bridge deck is 2’8”. 

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Feb. 1, 2018
This picture shows the east side end abutment with wing walls. The contractor hauled in Type 1 aggregate for the subgrade of the approach slab. After each layer was added, crew members compacted the aggregate. Once the last layer is compacted, the epoxy-coated reinforcing steel will be placed. After all the steel is set, the contractor will pour concrete. After the concrete is placed, the proper cure and protection will be performed like the previous pictures show. This process will complete the concrete approach slab on the east side. 

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