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Missouri Department of Transportation

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Enhanced Pedestrian Crossings



New Enhanced Crossings Help Pedestrians Safely Get Across Busy Roads

 

MoDOT is using a new enhanced pedestrian crossing system at locations across the state. The new crossings make it easier for pedestrians to safely get across busy roads at locations that are not at signalized intersections. It also minimizes traffic delays, because it only operates when a pedestrian activates it.

 

To drivers, the enhanced pedestrian crossing includes a triangular arrangement of  lights. When a pedestrian presses the walk button, a flashing yellow appears, alerting drivers that someone wants to cross. The flashing yellow will then turn a solid yellow to warn drivers to slow down and get ready to stop.

 

Next, two red lights will be displayed, requiring cars to stop. After a few seconds, the red lights will alternately flash indicating that drivers may proceed after stopping IF there are no pedestrians in their lane. 

 

When pedestrians are not present, the lights will not be on and drivers can proceed without stopping. Check out the diagram below describing the sequence seen by the motorists and the corresponding messages seen by the pedestrians.

 

 

Enhanced Pedestrian crossing

 

Use of this enhanced pedestrian crossing is common in Europe and is technically referred to as HAWK - (High-intensity Activated Cross Walk). Since its introduction in the United States, studies have shown a decrease in pedestrian-related accidents.

 

 

 

The following are videos from other agencies across the country explaining enhanced pedestrian crossings:

 

 

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